Pen Review: The Delta Fusion 82

I can’t really remember the last time I was so excited about a modern pen offering. Well, quite frankly, as a vintage pen collector, that might not sound like much, but since the first of the year, my collection of modern pens has grown impressively. We see a lot of new pens here at Anderson Pens and while many that come out are interesting, good writers, none have made me as crazy as the new Delta Fusion 82.

I first heard about the Fusion nib sometime in September. I get product information from Delta about every two to three weeks. This new Fusion nib interested me. Not because it was a patented process to fuse the 18k plate on top of the steel nib, but just because it was a different approach, and it just plain looked cool. Delta was trying something different with the nib, a piece of the fountain pen that by most accounts has basically been unchanged since the 1850′s. They get points for that.

Delta Fusion 82 Nib

Delta Fusion 82 Nib

At the Dallas Pen Show in September, I got a chance to see the Fusion nib in person. It comes in three different pens, the Hippocrates, the Fusion 1, and the Fusion 82. I’ll be honest. In the past when someone has mentioned Delta, the first thought that comes to mind is a big chunky, clunky pen with tacky and large hardware. Not my style. When I went up to my Delta representative’s table and asked about the nib he handed me the Fusion 82. I was shocked. Had there been a full pen case of modern pens and just the Fusion 82 in the case, I never would have been able to pick the Delta from the rest. Here it was, the most un-Delta Delta I had seen in my brief experience with the company. A classic balance or cigar shaped pen with nice trim. Nothing tacky about it.

The Delta Fusion 82

The Delta Fusion 82

I took a quick scribble on some paper and was really pleased with the writing characteristics. I then took a closer look at the plastic. It was really a new approach to a material. The pen I had in hand was brown but looked like the surface of the moon. Rotating the pen in the light changed the way it looked. This was really a pen you needed to see in person to get a good grasp of. Pictures do not do this pen justice.

When we got back from the show we decided we would get a couple of them (by we I really mean me). We placed our order and then proceeded to wait. A week later our order came in, minus the Delta’s. OK, I can be patient. I think. A few more weeks go by and I hear they are on back order. Patience. Then one day I get an invoice with tracking numbers. More patience. Then for three days there is no update to the tracking. At this point, I’m certain Lisa thinks I’m completely obsessed and not concentrating on anything else other than the location of my pen. Then it happens, an update to the tracking tells me it will arrive one day earlier than expected!

The suspense is killing me as I have just arrived at work and will not be home for another eight hours. I am constantly pressing F5 to refresh. F5, F5, F5, F5. Out for delivery it says. It’s here in Oshkosh and that’s where I am, maybe they can just stop by work and drop it off? Perhaps not. Breathe, make your way through the day and it will be fine. What if it comes and nobody is home to get the package? I may have to wait another day!! All is well and Lisa is home to get the package. I open it up and see one of the coolest pieces of packaging since we first got TWSBI 540′s.

Delta Outer Box

Delta Outer Box

The outer box is nothing special. A almost square-ish black box with a paper label on it. No big deal, but open it up and there lies an impressive box with an acrylic top and bottom. The top is held tight by an elastic band, so releasing that allows you to swivel the top up to reveal the insides. The top of the box shows off what appears to be a pseudo patent type image and lettering in gold. Pretty cool. Twist open the top and the pen is shown resting inside the box. The paper box also includes a smaller box which includes three cartridges. All the necessary paperwork is also in this box.

The Delta Fusion 82 Inner Box

The Delta Fusion 82 Inner Box

Ok, now to the good stuff. I take the pen out of the box and uncap the pen. There is is the mythical Fusion nib. That which lays claim to all sorts of chemical wizardry. Love it or hate it, you’ve got to admit, this is a pretty nib. The patterning on the pen is outstanding. A very pretty color, and even though the color is listed as “brown”, it is so much more than that. It is more of a milk chocolate with marbeling. Rotating this pen in the light reveals all sorts of stunning reflections. It’s really a pretty pen. I also notice, while not listed as a limited edition pen, the back of the cap has a unique serial number on it. In fact, after checking all four of the pens I received, all of them have a different number, and two of them were the exact same nib size. Interestingly, this number does not appear on the outer box anywhere. The cap band sports the Fusion 82 imprint in connected script much like those found on chrome automobile emblems of the 1950′s. Fusion is nicely centered around the front of the cap and 82 is centered around the rear of the cap. Delta Italy is engraved on the back of the cap right above the serial number. The barrel sports no imprint of any kind. The section is of matching material as the rest of the pen which I like.

Opening the Inner Box

Opening the Inner Box

Opening up the pen we have a nice Delta convertor which is of the threaded kind. I’m seeing these on several pens in the Yafa family and I like them. The only problem is most people are used to a push on convertor and might try to pull this off. Now days I try to unscrew any convertor first, just to be sure.

The Delta Fusion 82

The Delta Fusion 82

The pen is a nice size. It is balance shaped with rounded and tapered ends and overal length is 5-5/8″ capped, barrel length is 5-1/16″, and posted the length is 6-5/16″. The barrel is about 1/2″ in diameter. The clip seems a little bulky looking to me in contrast to the rest of the pen, but I can live with it. It has good spring to it and slides in and out of my pockets easily. Overall the pen has an amazing shine to it, in fact mine came with a small bit of buffing residue still on it. That’s ok, it wiped right off. It’s really an amazing finish, and highly polished is the way to go.

Fit and finish on the Fusion 82 is excellent. The threads feel nice and tight and secure, much like my Edison Herald. I’m not crazy about how the pen posts though, it seems like I have to jam it on there to get it to stay, but once posted it doesn’t come off. It’s just something I have to get used to. It’s really sturdy once posted.

Delta Fusion 82

Delta Fusion 82

I fill up the pen finally and wipe off the nib. I was concerned at first the 18kt plate on the top would attract ink but it does not. My nib choice was a Medium, and I used my favorite Montblanc burgundy for this test. Putting nib to paper for the first time was really a wonderful experience. The nib was VERY smooth. Even when used on the oily notebooks I am given to use at work it has never skipped, hesitated, and always starts first time, every time, even after several days of not having been used. A true Medium width and a slightly wet writer, which is perfect for me. Say all you want about ridiculous marketing schemes by Delta, this is one nice writing pen. I don’t care what they say, the whole package is beautiful, and the price point is excellent for what you are getting. Currently available in Black, Blue, Brown, Charcoal Grey, Fuscia, and Olive.  I realize you might think I’m just trying to sell you a pen, but this is the first pen in a long time I’ve actually wanted to buy. All the other pens I’ve reviewed I do genuinely like, and given time and exposure would have bought them, but this one I actively sought out. When you see me at a show, just ask to try it. I guarantee you’ll like it.

Cheers!
Brian